No respect for the elders and senior citizens and grandparents

asian elder respect americans

"Why do most Americans treat the elders like crap?"


Typically, in Asian culture, respect for the elders (senior citizens), such as grandmothers and grandfathers, is very important. In Korean, we change the entire way of speaking when talking and addressing to an elder. It consists of a more formalized language that’s indicative of respect. When I was in Korea, you give up your seat in the subway when an elder is present. You bow and never call them out by saying “hey!” You open doors and never smoke in their presence. When you are drinking beer, you turn to the right and then drink. You should pour the drink for them with both hands. You definitely don’t curse or utter profanities in front of them. You don’t talk over them or talk to them as if they are beneath you.

But in American culture, it seems the older generations get treated like shit sometimes. There seems to be no respect. They are sometimes viewed as a nuisance because they are slow drivers on the road. It seems they are forgotten and turned away by society. I’ve seen people yell, scream, and curse in front of their grandparents. If you’re Asian, you have to agree with me that the idea of respect for the elders is more prevalent and important amongst Asians than the general American population. The “oldies” in America, such as the aging baby boomers, are considered old fashion and passé. They are not viewed as wise and full of life with lots of fascinating stories. What do you think?

Your Parents Raised You to be Single, SAM

asian guy single culture

"Me so horny"


SAMs are frustrated, and I know a lot of you want to blame girls  and American culture for your frustrations.  But, before you do, blame your parents and Asian culture.  “What?!!”, you ask?  Let me explain.

The way we are raised as Asians, we tend to give respect and power to our parents.  This is the influence of Confucianism on Asian cultures, which preaches group harmony, respect for elders, and devotion to family.  We are subordinate to our family name and legacy. We learn to be obedient, nice, predictable, and well-mannered in order to maintain this family harmony.  We are taught to behave everywhere we go, and not tarnish the family name.  We learn what is acceptable behavior, and suppress our personal expression at times.  Lots of Asians do what their parents say, and spend all their time trying to please them by becoming lawyers and doctors, or marrying within their race.  We are more cautious of our actions, tend to express less since the less you express, the less you can be criticized, both at home and at school.   Continue reading